Adverse drug reaction








Preventable Adverse Drug Reactions A Focus on Drug Interactions

9/13/2014
01:18 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Adverse drug reaction
Preventable Adverse Drug Reactions A Focus on Drug Interactions

Welcome to the Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) learning module. The module will begin with a presentation of a case that was published in 1990. This case.

2) It can be hard to determine if an individual drug caused a reaction in a complicated patient receiving multiple medications. The bottom line is, even when in doubt about whether a drug caused the reaction, report it. However, the temporal relationship of a reaction with regard to the administration of a new medication can be helpful. Also, biological plausibility (asking if the drug’s mechanism of action makes this possible or likely) can also be helpful.

N Engl J Med 1991;324(6):377–384.

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Overview of Adverse Drug Reactions - The Merck Manuals

7/12/2014
03:04 | Author: Chloe Allen

Adverse drug reaction
Overview of Adverse Drug Reactions - The Merck Manuals

Learn about Adverse Drug Reactions symptoms, diagnosis and treatment in the Merck Manual. HCP and Vet versions too!.

Diphenhydramine Some Trade Names BENADRYL.

Duloxetine Some Trade Names CYMBALTA Antibiotics.

Risedronate Some Trade Names ACTONEL.

Toxic epidermal necrolysis (see Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis ) Some antibiotics Penicillins Quinolones Anticonvulsants.

Cisplatin Some Trade Names PLATINOL.

NSAIDs (repeated use of excessive doses).

Imipramine Some Trade Names TOFRANIL.

Naproxen Some Trade Names ALEVE ANAPROX NAPROSYN Aminoglycoside antibiotics Gentamicin Kanamycin Some chemotherapy drugs.

Tetracycline Some Trade Names SUMYCIN.

Methotrexate Some Trade Names TREXALL Antifungals.

Cyclophosphamide Some Trade Names LYOPHILIZED CYTOXAN.

Drugs used to treat malaria or tuberculosis in people with G6PD enzyme deficiency.

Atorvastatin Some Trade Names LIPITOR.

Ibuprofen Some Trade Names ADVIL MOTRIN Ketoprofen.

Lisinopril Some Trade Names PRINIVIL Bone fractures Proton pump inhibitors.

Tetracycline Some Trade Names SUMYCIN.

Naproxen Some Trade Names ALEVE ANAPROX NAPROSYN Anticoagulants Heparin.

Cisplatin Some Trade Names PLATINOL.

NSAIDs (repeated use of excessive doses).

Chloramphenicol Some Trade Names CHLORAMPHENICOL.

Lisinopril Some Trade Names PRINIVIL Bone fractures Proton pump inhibitors.

Stomach or intestinal ulcers (with or without bleeding) NSAIDs.

Angioedema (swelling of the lips, tongue, and throat causing difficulty breathing) ACE inhibitors.

Chloramphenicol Some Trade Names CHLORAMPHENICOL.

Drospirenone/ethinyl estradiol Some Trade Names CLIMARA MENOSTAR.

Birth control drugs (all forms including patches and pills).

Naproxen Some Trade Names ALEVE ANAPROX NAPROSYN Aminoglycoside antibiotics Gentamicin Kanamycin Some chemotherapy drugs.

Iron supplements (in excessive amounts) — Antidepressants.

Angioedema (swelling of the lips, tongue, and throat causing difficulty breathing) ACE inhibitors.

Ventricular tachycardia (see Ventricular Tachycardia ) Antiarrhythmics Amiodorone Procainamide.

Duloxetine Some Trade Names CYMBALTA Antibiotics.

Etidronate Some Trade Names DIDRONEL.

Drospirenone/ethinyl estradiol Some Trade Names CLIMARA MENOSTAR.

Diphenhydramine Some Trade Names BENADRYL.

Clozapine Some Trade Names CLOZARIL Chemotherapy drugs.

Ibuprofen Some Trade Names ADVIL MOTRIN Ketoprofen.

Haloperidol Some Trade Names HALDOL.

Methotrexate Some Trade Names TREXALL Vinblastine.

Warfarin Some Trade Names COUMADIN Bisphosphonates.

Aspirin Some Trade Names BAYER.

Anemia (resulting from decreased production or increased destruction of red blood cells) Certain antibiotics.

Anemia (resulting from decreased production or increased destruction of red blood cells) Certain antibiotics.

Chloroquine Some Trade Names ARALEN Isoniazid Primaquine.

Clozapine Some Trade Names CLOZARIL Chemotherapy drugs.

In older people (see Aging and Drugs ), the brain is commonly affected, often resulting in drowsiness and confusion.

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Adverse drug reactions MHRA

5/11/2014
05:06 | Author: Allison King

Adverse drug reaction
Adverse drug reactions MHRA

An adverse drug reaction (ADR) is a response to a medicinal product which is noxious and unintended. Response in this context means that a.

In The Yellow Card Scheme.

Type A reactions also include those that are not directly related to the desired pharmacological action of the drug (e.g. dry mouth that is associated with tricyclic antidepressants).

Type E Reactions Type E, or ‘end-of-use’ reactions, are associated with the withdrawal of a medicine.

Other classification schemes have also been proposed, such as ‘DoTS’, which takes into account Dose-related, Time-related and Susceptibility factors.

Studies performed in an attempt to quantify this have shown adverse drug reactions account for 1 in 16 hospital admissions, and for 4% of hospital bed capacity.

The Yellow Card Scheme relies on reporting of suspected adverse drug reactions where there is a suspicion that there is a causal relationship between the medicinal product taken and the suspected reaction experienced.

ADRs themselves are also thought to occur in 10-20% of hospital in-patients, and one study found that over 2% of patients admitted with an adverse drug reaction died, approximay 0.15% of all patients admitted.

Other things to be alert for include:

An extended version of this classification system is shown here:.

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The public health crisis of adverse drug reactions -

3/10/2014
07:12 | Author: Chloe Allen

Adverse drug reaction
The public health crisis of adverse drug reactions -

How Serious Is the Problem and How Often and Why Does It Occur? Although some adverse drug reactions (ADR) are not very serious, others cause the death.

Based on the Do Not Use principle we have advocated concerning certain drugs for more than 16 years in our Worst Pills, Best Pills books, web site, and monthly newsletter, several published studies have examined the extent to which people are prescribed drugs that are contraindicated because there are safer alternatives. 11. One study, whose authors stated that “Worst Pills, Best Pills stimulated this research,” found that almost one out of four older adults living at home—6.6 million people a year—were prescribed a “potentially inappropriate” drug or drugs, placing them at risk of such adverse drug effects as mental impairment and sedation, even though the study only examined the use of a relatively short list of needlessly dangerous drugs (fewer than the number listed as Do Not Use drugs on this site).

Although the rate of drug-induced hospitalization is higher in older adults (an average of about 10% of all hospitalizations for older adults are caused by adverse drug reactions) because they use more drugs, a significant proportion of hospitalizations for children are also caused by adverse drug reactions.

An analysis of numerous studies in which the cause of hospitalization was determined found that approximay 1.5 million hospitalizations a year were caused by adverse drug reactions.

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Adverse reactions to drugs The BMJ

1/9/2014
09:50 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Adverse drug reaction
Adverse reactions to drugs The BMJ

An adverse reaction to a drug has been defined as any noxious or unintended reaction to a drug that is administered in standard doses by the proper route for.

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Drug side effect —Undesirable pharmacological effect at recommended doses.

A drug allergy is an immunologically mediated reaction that exhibits specificity and recurrence on re-exposure to the offending drug.

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