Alcoholic epilepsy








Alcohol Epilepsy Foundation

5/16/2014
12:53 | Author: Molly Young

Alcoholic epilepsy
Alcohol Epilepsy Foundation

When alcohol is related to seizures, it is often the state of alcohol withdrawal that Some studies have shown that alcoholism, or chronic abuse of alcohol.

If you have epilepsy, drinking alcohol can have serious consequences. Most people with epilepsy are told to not drink, but that’s not always realistic. Doctors and pharmacists are always warning people with epilepsy about alcohol. Others are told to drink moderay. So what should people with seizures and epilepsy be aware of?.

Comments (0)



Alcoholism and epilepsy

11/25/2014
08:34 | Author: Chloe Allen

Alcoholic epilepsy
Alcoholism and epilepsy

There is a scarcity of population-based epidemiological investigations concerning the prevalence of epilepsy among alcoholics, and of alcoholism among.

more. Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function.

Generate a file for use with external citation management software.

There is a scarcity of population-based epidemiological investigations concerning the prevalence of epilepsy among alcoholics, and of alcoholism among epileptic patients. It is suggested that a uniform definition be adopted so as to minimize confusion when comparing data from different laboratories. This is because it is difficult to pinpoint alcohol as the only etiology; more likely, alcohol is only one factor among others (e.g., head trauma, cerebral infarct, alcohol withdrawal, and metabolic effects of alcohol) in provoking seizures. Although there is general agreement that excessive alcohol intake can increase the frequency of seizures in epileptic patients, limited available data suggest that light to moderate social alcohol drinking may not affect seizure frequency. Except for a few anomalous cases, evidence for the direct seizure-provoking effect of alcohol is not strong. However, epileptic patients should be warned about the possible adverse effects of alcohol, especially those who have refractory forms of epilepsy. Patients with only the latter kind of seizures should not need chronic antiepileptic medication. The term "alcoholic epilepsy" has been used with varying definitions in different investigations. Because seizures are a symptom and not a disease, it is often difficult to distinguish epileptic seizures from alcohol-withdrawal seizures. Available data seem to suggest that the prevalence of epilepsy among alcoholics is at least triple that in the general population, and that alcoholism may be more prevalent among epileptic patients than in the general population.

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA.

Comments (0)

Seizures in alcohol-dependent patients epidemiology

11/24/2014
06:01 | Author: Nicholas Clark

Alcoholic epilepsy
Seizures in alcohol-dependent patients epidemiology

The relationship between alcohol and seizures is complex and multifaceted. The prevalence of epilepsy in alcohol-dependent patients of western industrialised.

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA.

Alcohol acts on the brain through several mechanisms that influence seizure threshold. The first seizure not related to alcohol withdrawal should not result in permanent drug treatment in an alcohol-dependent patient, because of poor compliance and the high likelihood of remission. Other seizures in alcohol-dependent individuals may be due to concurrent metabolic, toxic, infectious, traumatic, neoplastic and cerebrovascular diseases and are frequently partial-onset seizures.

Comments (3)Read more

Death from seizures induced by chronic alcohol abuseDoes it exist?

9/23/2014
04:52 | Author: Chloe Allen

Drugs used to treat epilepsy
Death from seizures induced by chronic alcohol abuseDoes it exist?

Summary. In a forensic setting, deaths due to seizures, either epileptic or other, present a well-known problem. Cause of death is rarely established on the basis.

Comments (0)

Chronic alcohol use and first symptomatic epileptic seizures

7/22/2014
02:25 | Author: Molly Young

Alcoholic epilepsy
Chronic alcohol use and first symptomatic epileptic seizures

Abstract. Objective: To establish whether chronic alcoholism and alcohol consumption are risk factors for developing a first symptomatic epileptic seizure.

No substantial difference was evident between acute and remote symptomatic seizures, although acute seizures had a slightly higher risk in all alcohol consumption categories. Considering each putative cause, we found a minimal (not statistically significant) effect of alcohol for stroke and head trauma patients, but only for high doses in the latter.

No assumptions were made with regard to the effects of alcohol: seizures occurring during alcohol withdrawal and in persons with a history of chronic alcohol abuse were therefore divided into idiopathic/cryptogenic, acute, or remote symptomatic solely on the absence or presence of an insult to the CNS, its type, and its time relation with the seizure.

Comments (5)Read more