Anticonvulsants epilepsy








Common Anticonvulsants - The Center for Epilepsy and Seizure

10/26/2014
11:39 | Author: Steven Lewis

Anticonvulsants epilepsy
Common Anticonvulsants - The Center for Epilepsy and Seizure

Adjunctive therapy in a broad range of seizures, including Atonic, Myoclonic, Used in combination with other anticonvulsants to treat partial seizures in adults.

Passes into breast milk. Notify physician of kidney or liver problems Valium Diazepam (Benzodiazepine). Not recommended for under four years of age. May reduce effectiveness of oral contraceptives. Causes birth defects in animal studies.

Do not take if you have Alzheimer’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis or have had a stroke Trileptal Oxcarbazepine. Do not take if seriously depressed.

Currently not recommended under age of 18 as serious skin reactions more likely Luminal Phenobarbital (Barbiturate).

Drowsiness, dizziness, blurred vision, lethargy, nausea/vomiting, change in liver function Hypersensitivity/ allergic reaction.

Used to treat partial seizures in children 4-16 yrs., alone or in conjunction with other AED’s.

Drowsiness, hyperactivity, nausea/vomiting, sleep disturbances Hypersensitivity /allergic reaction Zonegran Zonisamide.

Hypersensitivity, allergic reaction, impaired liver function, low blood plaet count, stupor, coma Depakote (Epival).

Take at least two hours after taking an antacid.

CNS toxicity, vision disturbances, Rhinitis, Pharyngitis.

Myoclonic, effective but unacceptable toxicities with Partial and Tonic -clonic.

Do not take with alcohol.

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A new generation of anticonvulsants for the treatment of epilepsy in

12/25/2014
09:18 | Author: Chloe Allen

Anticonvulsants epilepsy
A new generation of anticonvulsants for the treatment of epilepsy in

Over the past 12 years, a number of new anticonvulsant drugs have been introduced for the treatment of childhood epilepsy. The present article reviews these.

In Canada, the use of topiramate for infantile spasms is generally reserved for patients who have failed vigabatrin and steroid treatments. Topiramate (Topamax, Janssen-Ortho Inc, Canada) is a broad-spectrum AED that has demonstrated efficacy in placebo-controlled trials in children with partial-onset seizures, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and infantile spasms ( 24 – 28 ).

When considering the selection of an antiepileptic drug (AED) for the treatment of childhood epilepsy, there are a number of considerations unique to children that should be taken into account.

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Anticonvulsants used for Generalised Seizures

10/24/2014
07:23 | Author: Molly Young

Anticonvulsants epilepsy
Anticonvulsants used for Generalised Seizures

Seizures treatment and symptoms. Other relevant separate articles include Epilepsy in Adults and Epilepsy in Children. Which anti-convulsants are used for.

They are designed for health professionals to use, so you may find the language more technical than the condition leaflets. o PatientPlus articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines.

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Generalised seizures are characterised by widespread involvement of bilateral cortical regions at the outset and are usually accompanied by impairment of consciousness:. Other relevant separate articles include Status Epilepticus Management, Managing Epilepsy in Primary Care, Epilepsy in Adults, Epilepsy in Children and Young People, and Epilepsy in Elderly People.

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Second-Generation Anticonvulsants - EpilepsySeizures

8/23/2014
05:16 | Author: Allison King

Anticonvulsants epilepsy
Second-Generation Anticonvulsants - EpilepsySeizures

Second-generation anticonvulsants used to treat epilepsy include topiramate, gabapentin, and lamotrigine. Info for epilepsy patients and health.

Lamotrigine (Lamictal)—This drug is indicated for the adjunct treatment of partial seizures and for conversion to monotherapyin adults with partial seizures. No laboratory monitoring of drug levels are necessary. It is presently available in oral form and is taken twice daily. Its precise mechanism of action is unknown.

Last Modified: 14 Jul 2014.

Side effects include fatigue, dizziness, and imbalance. No laboratory monitoring of liver, kidney, or blood (hematologic) function is necessary.

It is available in oral tablets and in an injectable form, and is usually administered twice per day.

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First-Generation Anticonvulsants - EpilepsySeizures

6/22/2014
03:35 | Author: Molly Young

Anticonvulsants epilepsy
First-Generation Anticonvulsants - EpilepsySeizures

Treatment for epilepsy may involve medications called first-generation anticonvulsants.

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Last Modified: 02 Jun 2011.

If your little ghost or goblin has asthma or allergies, plan ahead to prevent a health scare.

Complete blood count (CBC), urinalysis, and liver function tests also should be performed routinely to monitor for possible adverse effects.

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