Consumer medicine








Consumer Medicine Information conundrums - Australian Prescriber

9/20/2014
05:12 | Author: Chloe Allen

Which medicine should i take
Consumer Medicine Information conundrums - Australian Prescriber

Summary. People have a right to receive accurate and up-to-date information about their medicines from their health professionals. Providing written and verbal.

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- Prevent Medication Errors - Consumer

7/19/2014
03:16 | Author: Allison King

Consumer medicine
- Prevent Medication Errors - Consumer

The medicine can be given to an adult or a child. Consumer Med Safety Announces the new Over-the-Counter Medicines, Tools and Resources Section.

This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

We are looking for consumers to help identify potential confusion with new drug names.

If you or a loved one have experienced a mistake with a medication or have a safety concern to share with others, we would like to hear from you. Learn how reporting events can help others.

See our Top 10 medication safety lists.

In April, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first home-use naloxone auto-injector, Evzio (Figure 1), for people who accidentally overdose on an opioid (narcotic). The medicine can be given to an adult or a child. The lifesaving auto-injector allows you or a family member to quickly inject the medicine to temporarily reverse the effects of an opioid overdose until emergency medical assistance is available.

However, steroids also have very serious adverse effects that may cause permanent organ damage. They may feel uncomfortable because their bodies are developing slower than some of the others kids their age. Steroids promote cell growth, especially in the muscles. For these reasons, some teenagers resort to trying steroids, drugs that mimic the actions of the male sex hormone testosterone. Or, they may be involved in sports and feel they need to increase their muscle mass or athletic performance. The teenage years can be very awkward for young boys and girls.

All the information you need – and plenty of information you didn’t even know you needed - so you and your family use OTC medications with utmost safety.

This website does not host any form of advertisements.

A unique resource dedicated entirely to medication error prevention with the use of insulin.

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AZ index of CMI

5/18/2014
01:24 | Author: Chloe Allen

Consumer medicine
AZ index of CMI

You can search the A-Z Index for Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) by Brand Name: the name given to the medicine by the company that.

Quicklinks Consumers Health Professionals. Second tab content goes here.

You can search the A-Z Index for Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) by the medicine's Brand Name. Search CMI's.

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This page was last updated on Thursday 2nd January 2014 at 2:55 PM does not display advertising or receive funding from advertising.

Note: the documents on this web site are PDF files. If you do not have a PDF reader, you can download one now.

If you do not find a CMI for your medicine on this page, contact the pharmaceutical company who makes the medicine or talk to your doctor or pharmacist. The information on this web site is intended for use in Australia only. It may differ from a CMI that you previously received from your doctor or pharmacist, or in your pack of medicine. The CMI for your medicine that is on this web site is the most up-to-date version available. This web site does not contain all CMIs for medicines sold in Australia and not all medicines have a CMI available for them. Always talk to your doctor or pharmacist about all aspects of your medicines, including why you are taking them and what benefits / risks you can expect. Reading the CMI does not take the place of counselling by a health professional.

There may be more than one brand name if more than one company makes the medicine. Brand Name: the name given to the medicine by the company that makes the medicine.

Box A284 South Sydney NSW 1235 Australia. 2010 Sponsored and funded by: GuildLink Pty Ltd ABN 83 090 249 960 P.O.

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Consumer Medicine Information - ASMI

3/17/2014
01:12 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Consumer medicine
Consumer Medicine Information - ASMI

Consumer Medicines Leaflets (CMI's) contain important information about your medicines.

Ask your pharmacist or doctor if you did not get one or if you want to discuss the medicine. The Commonwealth government has established a CMI Quality Assurance Reference Group to review CMIs. You can contact this group with any questions you have about CMIs by writing to: The Project Officer CMI Quality Assurance Reference Group c/- PO Box 764 North Sydney NSW 2059. Keep the CMI handy so you can read it again if you need to. You should get a CMI each time you get a new prescription medicine. CMIs either come as a leaflet in the medicine’s packaging or in the form of a computer printout from a pharmacist or doctor. They can also be downloaded from websites such as http://www.medicines.org.au/ or http://www.nps.org.au/.

It must be factual and not promotional. CMIs contain information that is important to know before and while using a medicine. The pharmaceutical company that makes the medicine writes the CMI. Consumer Medicine Information leaflets, or CMI for short, are specially written leaflets that provide information about Prescription medicines and Pharmacist-Only medicines. They are produced in accordance with Commonwealth Government regulations that specify the information they must contain and how they should be presented. They help you better understand the medicines you are taking.

Including all of this information can make a CMI quite long. But all of it is important.

You should be able to follow the headings and subheadings to find out easily what information you need to know.

A CMI includes the following information:

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