Dog epilepsy medication side effects








Phenobarbital side effects--how long? - Dogs Community - MedHelp

10/26/2014
12:40 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Dog epilepsy medication side effects
Phenobarbital side effects--how long? - Dogs Community - MedHelp

He had two seizures, one on Sunday and one on Monday, at almost exactly the I've read that all of these are possible phenobarbital side effects. How long do these usually last before the dog gets used to the medication?.

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Using Phenobarbital to treat Seizures in Dogs - Canine Seizures

12/25/2014
10:20 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Dog epilepsy medication side effects
Using Phenobarbital to treat Seizures in Dogs - Canine Seizures

Phenobarbital is the most widely prescribed medication for treating seizures in dogs Adverse Effects: The common side effects of Phenobarbital are excessive.

It is not uncommon for some patients to demonstrate depression or sedation when Phenobarbital therapy is initiated. Adverse Effects: The common side effects of Phenobarbital are excessive hunger, excessive thirst, excessive urination, lethargy and ataxia (hind end weakness). If these side effects do not resolve, or if they are extremely pronounced, talk to your veterinarian. These effects are usually transient and resolve as the patient acclimates to the medication.

Mean Elimination Half-Life: 37 to 73 hours.

Phenobarbital is known to increase liver enzymes so it is not uncommon to see elevations in AST, ALP and ALT on a blood chemistry test.

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Phenobarbital - Canine Epilepsy Resource Center

10/24/2014
08:20 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Dog epilepsy medication side effects
Phenobarbital - Canine Epilepsy Resource Center

If you notice any side effects, this will normally be in the first use as little as possible 'extra'food in giving medication.

To be on the safe side also check the last bottle of PB with the new one to make sure the dosage is the same regardless of the tablet size, if any questions call your pharmacist or veterinarian. Today all PB is generic. Occasionally your veterinarian or pharmacist will change pharmaceutical suppliers. But just beware of the change. If this happens you might notice a difference in the size/shape of the PB tablets. In general this should not present a problem for your dog.

Therefore it is important to use as little as possible 'extra'food in giving medication.

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Phenobarbital - Pet, Dog and Cat Medication and Prescription List

8/23/2014
06:20 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Dog epilepsy medication side effects
Phenobarbital - Pet, Dog and Cat Medication and Prescription List

Phenobarbital is an anticonvulsant used to control epilepsy in dogs and cats. decrease other neurons, resulting in lethargy and other unwanted side effects.

If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose, and continue with the regular schedule. Give the dose as soon as possible. Do not give the pet two doses at once.

Register or login to access mypetMD General Description.

Phenobarbital may result in these side effects:

Store in a tightly sealed container at room temperature.

* In the past 1 year * In the past 2 years * In the past 3 years * More than 3 years ago.

Phenobarbital’s neuron decreasing effects may also decrease other neurons, resulting in lethargy and other unwanted side effects.

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Veterinary Surgical Centers - Epilepsy

6/22/2014
04:40 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Dog epilepsy medication side effects
Veterinary Surgical Centers - Epilepsy

We recommend treating epilepsy when dogs have frequent seizures (i.e. greater What are the most common anti-seizure medications and their side effects?.

Are seizures harmful for my pet?

Very rare side effects: Potassium bromide Rare side effects:

Other medications (i.e. Keppra, Zonisamide) are often used in dogs with severe side effects to Phenobarbital and Potassium Bromide or in dogs with a high seizure frequency despite receiving Phenobarbital and Potassium Bromide.

Animals with well-controlled epilepsy typically lead normal lives. In animals with severe epilepsy requiring several medications at high doses and multiple trips to the emergency room for help controlling seizures, quality of life can be compromised for both the pet and the owner.

Although it is natural to be concerned, in reality we cannot be with our pets 24 hours/day.

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