Epilepsy surgery








Surgery Epilepsy Foundation

7/7/2014
03:38 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Epilepsy surgery
Surgery Epilepsy Foundation

Both medical and surgical approaches should be individualized to consider these factors when weighing the benefits of seizure control versus the risks of.

The benefits of surgery should be weighed carefully against its risks, however, because there is no guarantee that it will be successful in controlling seizures. Surgery is an alternative for some people whose seizures cannot be controlled by medications. It has been used for more than a century, but its use dramatically increased in the 1980s and 90s, reflecting its effectiveness as an alternative to seizure medicines.

Epilepsy treatment must consider a person's quality of life, not just the number of seizures. Both continued seizures and high doses of medication impose costs on all areas of a person's life—inlectual, psychological, social, educational, and employment.

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Types of Surgery for Epilepsy Options, Risks, Effectiveness, and More

5/6/2014
05:36 | Author: Chloe Allen

Epilepsy surgery
Types of Surgery for Epilepsy Options, Risks, Effectiveness, and More

Epilepsy surgery may be an option for people whose seizures are not controlled by medication, or who cannot tolerate the side effects of seizure medications.

Surgery may be an option for people with epilepsy whose seizures are disabling and/or are not controlled by medication, or when the side effects of medication are severe and greatly affect the person's quality of life. Patients with other serious medical problems, such as cancer or heart disease, usually are not considered for epilepsy surgery.

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What happens inside your child's brain during a seizure? Here is a simplified explanation: Your brain is made up of millions of nerve cells called neurons, and these cells communicate with one another through tiny electrical impulses.

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Epilepsy surgery Definition - Tests and Procedures - Mayo Clinic

3/5/2014
07:54 | Author: Allison King

Epilepsy surgery
Epilepsy surgery Definition - Tests and Procedures - Mayo Clinic

Epilepsy surgery is a procedure that either removes or isolates the area of your brain where your seizures originate. If the section of your brain where your.

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If the section of your brain where your seizures begin is too vital to remove, your surgeon can make a series of incisions that prevent your seizures from spreading to the rest of your brain. Epilepsy surgery is a procedure that either removes or isolates the area of your brain where your seizures originate.

Epilepsy surgery works best for people who have seizures that always originate in the same place in their brains. If two appropriate drugs have failed, it is highly unlikely that any other anti-epileptic drug will help you. To be considered for epilepsy surgery, you must have tried at least two anti-seizure drugs without success.

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Surgery for Seizures Epilepsy The Johns Hopkins Epilepsy Center

11/14/2014
01:08 | Author: Chloe Allen

Epilepsy surgery
Surgery for Seizures Epilepsy The Johns Hopkins Epilepsy Center

Except in the rare instance of a rapidly growing brain tumor, epilepsy surgery is never an emergency – it should only be done after careful consideration of the.

Video: The Epilepsy Monitoring Unit.

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If epilepsy is caused by a tumor, cyst, lesion or other growth that won’t respond well to medication, your physician can help patients decide if surgery is an appropriate option. If seizures occur in one area of the brain, and that area can be removed easily and without causing other problems, surgery should be considered. Take a look at the following four questions:.

In reality, surgery should be among the first options considered if early trials with anticonvulsant medications are ineffective. Many people consider surgery – especially brain surgery – as the last alternative if all other treatment methods are not effective.

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If you answer yes to these four questions, you should obtain more information. It is important to note that except in the rare instance of a rapidly growing brain tumor, epilepsy surgery is not usually an emergency – it should only be done after careful consideration of the risks and benefits of the surgery.

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Article: Many Neurologists Unaware of Safety Risks Related to Anti-Epilepsy Drugs.

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For more information, request an appointment at the Epilepsy Center.

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Podcast: Adult Epilepsy Surgery Podcast: Pediatric Epilepsy.

Watch the recording here. Did you miss the online discussion with neurosurgeon William Anderson on epilepsy surgery? Dr. Anderson discusses treatment option for epilepsy and recent surgical advances that may offer help where medical management and medications have not.

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Epilepsy Surgery - Medscape Reference

9/13/2014
01:50 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Epilepsy surgery
Epilepsy Surgery - Medscape Reference

Epilepsy Surgery. In approximay 1/3 of patients with epilepsy seizures persist despite adequate trials of several antiepileptic drugs (AEDs).

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