Epileptic drugs








Lists of Antiepileptic Drugs Anticonvulsants The Good, the Bad

11/21/2014
10:29 | Author: Steven Lewis

Epileptic drugs
Lists of Antiepileptic Drugs Anticonvulsants The Good, the Bad

Two lists of all the antiepileptic drugs (AEDs)/anticonvulsants (ACs) we can think of, one by use and one alphabetical.

Know your sources!

Information on this table:. Here’s our big list of anticonvulsants / antiepileptic drugs ( AEDs ) approved by the US FDA - including trade names used overseas - to treat epilepsy and other seizure disorders.

Table of Contents ( hide ).

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Antiepileptic Drug Page List/Topic Index| Classifications of Antiepileptic Drugs

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Suicidal Behavior and Ideation and Antiepileptic Drugs

11/20/2014
08:02 | Author: Chloe Allen

Epileptic drugs
Suicidal Behavior and Ideation and Antiepileptic Drugs

Update 5/5/2009: AED class label changes. Manufacturers of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) or anticonvulsant drugs will update product labeling to include a.

The approved AEDs affected by these safety label changes are Carbatrol, Celontin, Depakene, Depakote ER, Depakote sprinkles, Depakote tablets, Dilantin, Equetro, Felbatol, Gabitril, Keppra, Keppra XR, Klonopin, Lamictal, Lyrica, Mysoline, Neurontin, Peganone, Stavzor, Tegretol, Tegretol XR, Topamax, Tranxene, Tridione, Trileptal, Zarontin, Zonegran, and generics. FDA approved updated labeling for these drugs on April 23, 2009.

AED class label changes.

As described in the January 31, 2008, Information for Health Care Professionals Sheet on AEDS, eleven antiepileptic drugs were included in FDA’s original pooled analysis of placebo-controlled clinical studies in which these drugs were used to treat epilepsy as well as psychiatric disorders and other conditions.

The increased risk of suicidal thoughts or behavior was generally consistent among the eleven drugs, with varying mechanisms of action and across a range of indications.

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Anti-Epileptic Drugs - The Epilepsy Centre The Epilepsy Centre

9/19/2014
06:53 | Author: Molly Young

Epileptic drugs
Anti-Epileptic Drugs - The Epilepsy Centre The Epilepsy Centre

Anti-epileptic drugs are the mainstay of treatment for epilepsy. Occasionally (for instance, in young children with very severe epilepsy) a special diet may be.

Anyone having a lot of seizures, should consult their doctor, who may adjust the dose of the anti–epileptic drug. Avoid carrying tablets in glass bottles as these may break during a seizure. During this period some people will experience adverse symptoms which can make them lose heart. It is important, therefore that the same amount of drug is taken each day. Syrups may be used for children who have difficulty in swallowing tablets. Changes in the make of the usual tablet or capsule should be avoided as the amount of drug absorbed from each different kind of pill can vary a little.

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New avenues for anti-epileptic drug discovery and development

7/18/2014
04:24 | Author: Allison King

Information metformin
New avenues for anti-epileptic drug discovery and development

Despite the introduction of over 15 third-generation anti-epileptic drugs, current medications fail to control seizures in 20–30% of patients.

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Anti-Epileptic Drugs - American Association for Clinical Chemistry

5/17/2014
02:15 | Author: Molly Young

Epileptic drugs
Anti-Epileptic Drugs - American Association for Clinical Chemistry

June 2013 Clinical Laboratory News: Volume 39, Number 6. Antiepileptic Drugs Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of the Newer Generation Drugs. Matthew D.

Saliva concentrations can be monitored, but they are only 5–10% of those in serum/plasma. Other than optimizing dosing in renal insufficiency patients, TDM has overall low utility in gabapentin therapy.

TDM of AEDs is challenging because no simple diagnostic tests can assess the clinical efficacy of any of the drugs. Careful clinical observation and labor-intensive electroencephalograms (EEG) remain the mainstays of clinical assessment. Furthermore, seizures by nature occur irregularly and unpredictably, making diagnosis difficult.

Furthermore, some individuals show good clinical response at levels above or below the standard reference range.

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