Lactic acidosis








Lactic acidosis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

11/16/2014
08:27 | Author: Molly Young

Lactic acidosis
Lactic acidosis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lactic acidosis is a physiological condition characterized by low pH in body tissues and blood (acidosis) accompanied by the buildup of lactate, especially.

Lactic acidosis sometimes occurs without hypoxia, for example, in rare inborn errors of metabolism where mitochondria do not function at full capacity. Also, muscle types that have few mitochondria and preferentially use glycolysis for ATP production (fast-twitch or type II fibers) are naturally prone to lactic acidosis. In such cases, when the body needs more energy than usual, for example during exercise or disease, mitochondria cannot match the cells' demand for ATP, and lactic acidosis results.

In this situation, glycolysis is increased to provide additional ATP, and the excess pyruvate produced is converted into lactate and released from the cell into the bloodstream, where it accumulates over time.

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Lactic acidosis MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

11/16/2014
06:06 | Author: Chloe Allen

Lactic acidosis
Lactic acidosis MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

Lactic acidosis is when lactic acid builds ups in the bloodstream faster than it can be removed. Lactic acid is produced when oxygen levels in the body drop.

Lactic acidosis sometimes occurs without hypoxia, for example, in rare inborn errors of metabolism where mitochondria do not function at full capacity. Also, muscle types that have few mitochondria and preferentially use glycolysis for ATP production (fast-twitch or type II fibers) are naturally prone to lactic acidosis. In such cases, when the body needs more energy than usual, for example during exercise or disease, mitochondria cannot match the cells' demand for ATP, and lactic acidosis results.

In this situation, glycolysis is increased to provide additional ATP, and the excess pyruvate produced is converted into lactate and released from the cell into the bloodstream, where it accumulates over time.

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Lactic Acidosis - Medscape Reference

11/16/2014
04:59 | Author: Nicholas Clark

Metformin information sheet
Lactic Acidosis - Medscape Reference

Lactic Acidosis. In basic terms, lactic acid is the normal endpoint of the anaerobic breakdown of glucose in the tissues.

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Glyburide And Metformin (Oral Route) - Drugs and Supplements

11/16/2014
02:32 | Author: Chloe Allen

Lactic acidosis
Glyburide And Metformin (Oral Route) - Drugs and Supplements

Under certain conditions, too much metformin can cause lactic acidosis. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are severe and quick to appear.

Lactic acidosis sometimes occurs without hypoxia, for example, in rare inborn errors of metabolism where mitochondria do not function at full capacity. Also, muscle types that have few mitochondria and preferentially use glycolysis for ATP production (fast-twitch or type II fibers) are naturally prone to lactic acidosis. In such cases, when the body needs more energy than usual, for example during exercise or disease, mitochondria cannot match the cells' demand for ATP, and lactic acidosis results.

In this situation, glycolysis is increased to provide additional ATP, and the excess pyruvate produced is converted into lactate and released from the cell into the bloodstream, where it accumulates over time.

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Lactic Acidosis - Symptoms, Causes, Treatments - HealthGrades

11/16/2014
12:25 | Author: Molly Young

Lactic acidosis
Lactic Acidosis - Symptoms, Causes, Treatments - HealthGrades

Lactic Acidosis Information Including Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Causes, Videos, Forums, and local community support. Find answers to.

Lactic acidosis sometimes occurs without hypoxia, for example, in rare inborn errors of metabolism where mitochondria do not function at full capacity. Also, muscle types that have few mitochondria and preferentially use glycolysis for ATP production (fast-twitch or type II fibers) are naturally prone to lactic acidosis. In such cases, when the body needs more energy than usual, for example during exercise or disease, mitochondria cannot match the cells' demand for ATP, and lactic acidosis results.

In this situation, glycolysis is increased to provide additional ATP, and the excess pyruvate produced is converted into lactate and released from the cell into the bloodstream, where it accumulates over time.

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