Medications to treat seizures








Anti-Seizure Medications for Chronic Pain - About.com

10/18/2014
02:06 | Author: Chloe Allen

Medications to treat seizures
Anti-Seizure Medications for Chronic Pain - About.com

Anticonvulsants, or anti-seizure medications, work as adjuvant analgesics. In other words, they can treat some types of chronic pain even.

Limited to 10 recipients. Separate multiple addresses with commas. We will not share any of the addresses on this form with third parties.

Did you mean ?

Send to a Friend via.

Accessed 6/14/09. American Chronic Pain Association. http://www.theacpa.org/documents/ACPA%20Meds%202007%20Final.pdf. APCA Medications and Chronic Pain: Supplement 2007.

2000 Nov;60(5):1029-52. Tremont-Lukats IW, Megeff C, and Backonja MM. Drugs. Anticonvulsants for Neuropathic Pain Syndromes: Mechanisms of Action and Place in Therapy.

This field is required.

Studies are still being conducted on the effectiveness of anti-seizure medications for chronic pain.

Comments (1)Read more



Anti-Seizure Medication to Treat Alcoholism CRC Health Group

8/17/2014
12:28 | Author: Chloe Allen

Drugs used to treat seizures
Anti-Seizure Medication to Treat Alcoholism CRC Health Group

The anti-seizure medication, Topamax, offers potential treatment of alcoholism.

Comments (0)

More about Treatment for Seizure Disorders

6/16/2014
02:58 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Medications to treat seizures
More about Treatment for Seizure Disorders

Seizure treatments can include medications such as Anticonvulsant. First and second generation anticonvulsants explained.

This also risks increasing the number and frequency of side effects, making it less likely that patients will take their medication appropriay. Seizures can be controlled with one agent in approximay 75 percent of patients. Management becomes complicated when patients are given medications in combinations. Monotherapy, treatment with a single agent, is the goal.

In making treatment decisions, it is helpful to look at risk factors that may predict a second seizure. Approximay 75 percent of seizure sufferers have only one seizure and no recurrence.

Comments (3)Read more

Grand Mal Seizures - Symptoms, Causes, Treatments

4/15/2014
04:36 | Author: Allison King

Medications to treat seizures
Grand Mal Seizures - Symptoms, Causes, Treatments

Grand Mal Seizures Information Including Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Causes, Videos, Forums, and local community support.

Grand mal seizures affect the entire body, and may happen just once or multiple times (as in the case of epilepsy). These seizures result from abnormal electrical activity in the brain. The cause of grand mal seizures may not be immediay recognized, if ever. Grand mal seizures, or generalized tonic-clonic seizures, are seizures that involve muscle contractions, muscle rigidity, and loss of consciousness. Treatable medical conditions that may be responsible for grand mal seizures include electrolyte imbalance, illicit drug use, brain tumor, meningitis, head trauma, and many others.

A single grand mal seizure often does not require treatment, although prompt medical evaluation is imperative. For patients with recurrent seizures, or epilepsy, many different types of treatments are available. Grand mal seizures are generally controlled with medications, surgery, or electrical stimulation.

Grand mal seizures are marked by amnesia (memory loss), so that the person who has the seizure does not remember what happened. While the seizure itself generally does not cause permanent damage, it is possible for injury to result during the seizure. Usually, people recover from a grand mal seizure feeling mild confusion, weakness, and tiredness.

Seek immediate medical care (call 911) for any seizure, as prompt medical treatment may reduce the risk and severity of future seizures.

Use of this website and any information contained herein is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement.

Grand mal seizures often last for several minutes. Grand mal seizures tend to follow a pattern of symptoms that can become recognizable. The seizure often starts with an aura, or a change in sensation characterized by hallucinations, dizziness, and abnormal sights, smells, tastes or feelings. The aura is followed by loss of consciousness, a contraction of all the muscles (tonic phase), and then rhythmic muscle spasms (clonic phase).

Comments (0)

Epilepsy Medication to treat seizures - Boots WebMD

2/14/2014
06:10 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Medications to treat seizures
Epilepsy Medication to treat seizures - Boots WebMD

Medication can successfully control seizures in about 70% of patients. However, they won't cure epilepsy.

See additional information. BootsWebMD does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

The type of medication prescribed will also depend on several factors specific to each patient, such as which side effects are tolerated by the patient, other illnesses they may have, and which way of taking medication is acceptable to the person with epilepsy. An accurate diagnosis of the type of epilepsy (not just the type of seizure, since most seizure types occur in different types of epilepsy) is very important in choosing the best treatment.

It is not exhaustive.

Comments (5)Read more