Medicines used for seizures








Diazepam (Valium, Diastat) - Comprehensive Epilepsy Center

11/12/2014
03:04 | Author: Chloe Allen

Medicines used for seizures
Diazepam (Valium, Diastat) - Comprehensive Epilepsy Center

When is diazepam used ? Most seizure medicines are given to prevent seizures from beginning. But some people with epilepsy experience intermittent periods.

Some people, particularly children, are prone to frequent and prolonged seizures whenever they have a relatively high fever. For these patients, the doctor may suggest keeping diazepam at home and using it whenever the patient’s temperature reaches a certain point to prevent these febrile seizures. Another use of diazepam involves the prevention of seizures that may accompany a fever, called febrile seizures.

These people require longer to clear the medication from the body, so if diazepam is given to them too often, the level can become high and cause unwanted effects like drowsiness, unsteadiness, or breathing problems.

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Quick injection helps stop epileptic seizures - Harvard Health Blog

9/11/2014
01:52 | Author: Chloe Allen

Medicines used for seizures
Quick injection helps stop epileptic seizures - Harvard Health Blog

For the trial, more than 4,000 emergency medical technicians were trained to administer seizure-stopping drugs called benzodiazepines two.

Mine are also ignored! I brow-beat her on enssmeger daily, ling her to stay home and get better and that she needs rest. I also told her to leave her bike at work and take a cab home one day last week!She is wayyyy too stubborn with too much will-power.

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With further testing for safety, though, that is likely to happen.

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Epi-Pen to Stop Epileptic Seizures? - ABC News - Go.com

7/10/2014
01:28 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Medicines used for seizures
Epi-Pen to Stop Epileptic Seizures? - ABC News - Go.com

Patients who received anticonvulsant drugs by IV drip, by contrast, suffered longer seizures, which continued on average for as long as five.

Food and Drug Administration. Although midazolam currently is used off-label to stop seizures, syringes with a standard dose of the medication – such as those used in the study -- are not currently approved by the U.S.

"Most seizures stop on their own without any type of medication," said McMullan, adding that the findings only apply to those who have prolonged seizures, known as status epilepticus.

While it might take a while until an auto-injector "epi-pen" of the medication is approved for caregivers, McMullan said paramedics can use the technique now.

"They can draw it up in a syringe and use it as a shot, just like how medications are given," said McMullan.

The study enrolled adults and children as young as 2 years old.

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"I am very excited that this is another tool in the arsenal for present lifesaving treatments for prolonged seizures," said McMullan.

"The earlier they are treated, the sooner the seizure will stop, the easier it will be to control and the better the outcome," said McMullan.

"It's difficult to start an IV in somebody who's having convulsions, who's shaking, and that difficulty can cause a delay in getting the IV started, which can cause a delay in stopping the seizure," said Silbergleit.

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Medicines to Stop a Seizure

5/9/2014
03:24 | Author: Allison King

Medicines used for seizures
Medicines to Stop a Seizure

Medications are used to halt prolonged or serial seizure activity. Photo Credit Needle & Syringe image by funkatronik from Fotolia.com.

Seizures--also called convulsions--occur when abnormal electrical signals in the brain cause simultaneous activity in the nerve cells. Most seizures last 1 to 2 minutes, stopping without medical intervention. Seizures, however, are sometimes prolonged or they may occur one after another, a condition called status epilepticus. Status epilepticus is a medical emergency in which medicines are used to stop the seizure activity. The Epilepsy Foundation reports that status epilepticus occurs in roughly 15 percent of people living with epilepsy.

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Absence Seizures Johns Hopkins Medicine Health Library

3/8/2014
05:40 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Medicines used for seizures
Absence Seizures Johns Hopkins Medicine Health Library

Most antiepileptic drugs aren't effective in treating absence seizures. Many people who suffer from absence seizures also have generalized seizures and so.

At this time, only two drugs have approval from the FDA to treat absence seizures: ethosuximide and valproic acid. Many people who suffer from absence seizures also have generalized seizures and so would need to take one or more of the medications listed above. Most antiepileptic drugs aren’t effective in treating absence seizures.

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Although most children who have typical absence seizures are otherwise normal, absence seizures can hinder learning and affect concentration at school, so treatment must be prompt.

Tests of the kidneys and liver.

Get plenty of sleep each night.

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These tests also can help to diagnose absence seizures or rule out other conditions: Blood tests.

CT or MRI scans.

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These are other possible symptoms of an absence seizure: Being very still.

If you continue to have absence seizures, it may not be safe for you to drive.

But you can also make some changes in your life to help prevent absence seizures from happening:.

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