Naltrexone








Naltrexone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

8/11/2014
03:29 | Author: Nicholas Clark

Naltrexone
Naltrexone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist used primarily in the management of alcohol dependence and opioid dependence. It is marketed in generic form as.

They noted, "Naltrexone is relatively easy to administer and free of serious adverse effects and, as we observed in the Asp40 carriers we studied, it appears to be highly effective.". "Because almost 25% of the treatment-seeking population carries the Asp40 allele, genetic testing of individuals before naltrexone treatment might be worth the cost and effort, especially if structured behavioral treatment were not being considered." This would enable treatment to be targeted by genetics to patients for whom it would be most effective.

This gene is rarely present among blacks; it is common among 60-70 percent of Asians.

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Frequently Asked Questions about Naltrexone - The Well

6/10/2014
05:18 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Naltrexone
Frequently Asked Questions about Naltrexone - The Well

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About Naltrexone Treatment for Alcoholism *. 1. What is naltrexone? Naltrexone is a medication that blocks the effects of.

Will I get sick If I stop naltrexone suddenly?. 12.

Third, naltrexone can interfere with the tendency to want to drink more if a recovering patient slips and has a drink. First, naltrexone can reduce craving, which is the urge or desire to drink. While the precise mechanism of action for naltrexone's effect is unknown, reports from successfully treated patients suggest three kinds of effects. Second, naltrexone helps patients remain abstinent.

Are there some people who should not take naltrexone?.

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Naltrexone - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses

4/9/2014
07:27 | Author: Steven Lewis

Naltrexone
Naltrexone - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses

Naltrexone hydrochloride, an opioid antagonist, is a synthetic congener of oxymorphone with no opioid agonist properties. Naltrexone hydrochloride differs in.

In an emergency situation in patients receiving fully blocking doses of Naltrexone, a suggested plan of management is regional analgesia, conscious sedation with a benzodiazepine, use of non-opioid analgesics or general anesthesia.

The drug is reported to be of greatest use in good prognosis opioid addicts who take the drug as part of a comprehensive occupational rehabilitative program, behavioral contract, or other compliance-enhancing protocol. Naltrexone, unlike methadone or LAAM (levo- alpha-acetyl-methadol), does not reinforce medication compliance and is expected to have a therapeutic effect only when given under external conditions that support continued use of the medication.

Although well absorbed orally, Naltrexone is subject to significant first pass metabolism with oral bioavailability estimates ranging from 5 to 40%.

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Revia (Naltrexone) Drug Information Description, User Reviews

2/8/2014
09:56 | Author: Chloe Allen

Naltrexone
Revia (Naltrexone) Drug Information Description, User Reviews

REVIA (naltrexone hydrochloride tablets USP), an opioid antagonist, is a synthetic congener of oxymorphone with no opioid agonist properties. Naltrexone.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Read All Potential Precautions of Revia »

REVIA is also related to the potent opioid antagonist, naloxone, or n-allylnoroxymorphone. REVIA (naltrexone hydrochloride tablets USP), an opioid antagonist, is a synthetic congener of oxymorphone with no opioid agonist properties. naltrexone hydrochloride. Naltrexone differs in structure from oxymorphone in that the methyl group on the nitrogen atom is replaced by a cyclopropylmethyl group.

Before using this medication, l your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: current or recent use (in the last 7 to 14 days) of any type of opioid drug (such as morphine, methadone, buprenorphine), kidney disease, liver disease.

Stimulant-related ER Visits Rise 300 Percent »

You should carry or wear medical identification stating that you are taking this drug so that appropriate treatment can be given in a medical emergency.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.

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The Low Dose Naltrexone Homepage

10/17/2014
01:05 | Author: Molly Young

Naltrexone
The Low Dose Naltrexone Homepage

FDA-approved naltrexone, in a low dose, can normalize the immune system — helping those with HIV/AIDS, cancer, autoimmune diseases, and central nervous.

In addition, people who had an autoimmune disease (such as lupus) often showed prompt control of disease activity while taking LDN. Bihari found that patients in his practice with cancer (such as lymphoma or pancreatic cancer) could benefit, in some cases dramatically, from LDN. In the mid-1990's, Dr.

— David Gluck, MD.

Please note that no response can be given to individual questions concerning medical symptoms or treatment.

Experiments by the compounding pharmacist, Dr. Bihari has reported seeing adverse effects from this problem.

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