Names of medicines








Medicines information - brand names and generics - NHS Choices

10/23/2014
11:39 | Author: Steven Lewis

Names of medicines
Medicines information - brand names and generics - NHS Choices

The names of medicines can often be confusing, as the same medicine can sometimes be called different things.

Both medicines have the same clinical effect, but each separate manufacturer can give it a different name.

Read more about regulating the safety of medicines. Generic medicines go through the same detailed safety and quality requirements as the original branded product.

They give the medicine a brand name for marketing purposes to make it more memorable, such as Viagra. On average, it takes the first 10-15 years of this period to develop the medicine and obtain a licence (read more about licensing medicines ).

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A-Z medicine listing - Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS)

12/22/2014
09:18 | Author: Chloe Allen

Names of medicines
A-Z medicine listing - Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS)

A-Z medicine listing. A |; B |; C |; D |; E |; F |; G |; H |; I |; K |; L |; M |; N |; O |; P |; Q |; R |; S |; T |; U |; V |; W |; Z |. Substance names are in all capitals. Brand names.

Substance names are in all capitals. Brand names are in italics ( View Brands ).

Commonwealth of Australia ABN: 83 605 426 759.

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Naming of medicines MHRA

10/21/2014
07:23 | Author: Molly Young

Names of medicines
Naming of medicines MHRA

The MHRA considers each application for a product name to ensure that the proposed name will allow the medicine to be taken safely and correctly. The name.

MHRA guideline for the naming of medicinal products and braille requirements for name on label (240Kb).

The guidance document incorporates aspects of the MHRA naming policy for invented names including, but not limited to, the construction of pharmaceutical trademarks, similarity of invented names to existing International Non-proprietary Names (INNs), use of suffixes for modified release preparations and use of umbrella branding.

In Medicines.

Home How we regulate Medicines Naming of medicines.

The guidance document consolidates MHRA policy on the naming of medicines and it is intended to provide detailed information and clarity of advice to applicants on the criteria applied by the MHRA when reviewing the acceptability of proposed names for medicinal products.

The name must also comply with legislative requirements and the MHRA has issued naming policy guidance with respect to invented names and qualifiers, umbrella segments, generic nomenclature and Braille requirements for product names.

The MHRA considers each application for a product name to ensure that the proposed name will allow the medicine to be taken safely and correctly.

Head office : 151 Buckingham Palace Road, Victoria, London, SW1W 9SZ General enquiries: To contact us about this website, use our feedback form.

Should you have any questions relating to the naming of medicines or the guideline please. This is the first publication of the guideline which will be a live document that will continue to evolve in future revisions.

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Why the same medicines can have different names - Boots WebMD

8/20/2014
05:16 | Author: Allison King

Names of medicines
Why the same medicines can have different names - Boots WebMD

For example, sildenafil is the generic name of a medicine used to treat erectile dysfunction. However, the company that makes sildenafil, Pfizer, sells it under the.

This frees up NHS resources to pay for other treatments. This can be important, particularly if there is a shortage of a particular product. It also gives the pharmacist the widest choice of products to dispense.

Many medicines have two names:

This is because generic medicines are usually as effective as the branded versions, but can cost up to 80% less. Prescribers (people who prescribe medicines, such as GPs) are encouraged to prescribe medicines by their generic name.

For example, sildenafil is the generic name of a medicine used to treat erectile dysfunction.

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Same medicine, different brands NPS MedicineWise

6/19/2014
03:35 | Author: Molly Young

Names of medicines
Same medicine, different brands NPS MedicineWise

It's important to remember that most medicines have two different names — an active ingredient and a brand name — and there may be more.

A company may therefore give their medicine another easier to say or memorable name under which the medicine is sold. This is the brand name.

Medicines may also be sold under several different brands — an original brand, and generic brands. It’s a bit like with groceries where different companies can produce the same product and market it under different brand names.

For some people with allergies or intolerances, it's important to find out more about the inactive ingredients in your medicines.

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