New sleeping pill on the market








Orexin receptor antagonists A new class of sleeping pill - National

10/17/2014
02:06 | Author: Chloe Allen

New sleeping pill on the market
Orexin receptor antagonists A new class of sleeping pill - National

Orexin receptor antagonists: A new class of sleeping pill Orexin Receptor Antagonists Differ from Standard Sleep Drugs by Promoting Sleep at Doses That Do.

Diagnosis & treatment of insomnia.

Potential new sleeping aid may improve sleep.

Orexins are involved in wakefulness and arousal; we know this, in part, because some people with narcolepsy (a sleep disorder that causes chronic sleepiness and involuntarily sleep) have a loss of orexin-producing neurons in that area of the brain. Orexins (also called hypocretins) are chemicals that are naturally produced by an area of the brain called the hypothalamus.

Orexin sleep aids affect a different chemical system in the brain than do current prescription and non-prescription sleep aids. Many of the commonly prescribed sleep aids cause sleepiness by enhancing GABA—a wide-reaching inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Orexin sleep aids block the brain’s receptors for the chemical orexin. Since they target a more localized area of the brain, the hope is that they will cause fewer side effects.

Since this chemical plays a role in keeping people awake and alert, a medication that blocks its action has the potential to promote sleep. Sleep aids that target orexin action are known as “orexin receptor antagonists,” which means that they block the signaling of the chemical orexin in the brain.

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The sleep aid, Suvorexant (brand name Belsomra(R)), which targets orexins, is the first of its kind to be approved by the FDA. Scientists identified orexins in 1998, and since then there has been considerable research into their role in regulating arousal and sleep, as well as their potential as a target for the treatment of sleep disorders like insomnia. It will be available for purchase in the near future.

Orexin Receptor Antagonists Differ from Standard Sleep Drugs by Promoting Sleep at Doses That Do Not Disrupt Cognition.

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Merck Wins U.S. Approval of New Type of Sleeping Pill - Bloomberg

8/16/2014
12:28 | Author: Chloe Allen

New sleeping pill on the market
Merck Wins U.S. Approval of New Type of Sleeping Pill - Bloomberg

Merck & Co., the second-largest U.S. drugmaker, won approval to sell its treatment for insomnia, a new type of drug considered to have fewer.

About 60 million Americans a year have insomnia frequently or for extended periods of time, according to the National Institutes of Health. The bulk of prescriptions, 41 million of 56 million, were written for generic versions of Ambien and Ambien CR. Sales of generic and brand-name sleep aids totaled $1.5 billion last year, according to IMS Health Holdings Inc., a Danbury, Connecticut-based data analysis firm.

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The company’s shares have increased 19 percent in the past 12 months.

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Groundbreaking sleeping pill may put insomnia issues to bed - CBS

6/15/2014
02:58 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

New sleeping pill on the market
Groundbreaking sleeping pill may put insomnia issues to bed - CBS

But a new type of sleeping pill may offer some hope. On Wednesday the FDA approved "Belsorma," a new drug from Merck & Co., which will be.

The drug works by inhibiting orexin, a neuro-chemical that keeps the brain awake.

Approximay 60 million Americans have some form of insomnia, a condition that affects 40 percent of women and 30 percent of adult men. But a new type of sleeping pill may offer some hope.

"The statement from Merck is that when they did the study they didn't actually see any dependencies or any symptoms of withdrawal," Ash said. We have yet to see what will happen when they expand it to larger populations.". "But when they do these studies it's always a small number of patients.

The country's network of water pipes is aging and fixing the problem isn't easy or cheap.

On Wednesday the FDA approved "Belsorma," a new drug from Merck & Co., which will be available late 2014 or early 2015.

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Press Announcements FDA approves new type of sleep drug

4/14/2014
04:36 | Author: Allison King

New sleeping pill on the market
Press Announcements FDA approves new type of sleep drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Belsomra (suvorexant) tablets for use as needed to treat difficulty in falling and staying.

Belsomra alters the signaling (action) of orexin in the brain. Orexins are chemicals that are involved in regulating the sleep-wake cycle and play a role in keeping people awake. Belsomra is an orexin receptor antagonist and is the first approved drug of this type.

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Belsomra will be dispensed with an FDA-approved patient Medication Guide that provides instructions for its use and important safety information.

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FDA approves new sleeping drug from Merck Daily Mail Online

2/13/2014
06:10 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

New sleeping pill on the market
FDA approves new sleeping drug from Merck Daily Mail Online

Popular: Sleeping pills such as Ambien and Lunesta are non-diazepine hypnotics. Belsomra is first the first of a new class of drugs. It is a highly.

Kate dazzles in baby blue gown during second public appearance of the day after winning her battle with severe morning sickness.

Doctors should warn patients taking the highest dose against next-day driving or activities that require full concentration, the FDA said.

By Associated Press Reporter.

Inc., which is based in Whitehouse Station, New Jersey, rose 82 cents, or 1.4 percent, to close at $57.85. Shares of Merck & Co.

It is a highly selective antagonist for orexin, a neurotransmitter found in a specific part of the brain that can help keep a person awake.

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