Nhs epilepsy medicines








Epilepsy - NHS Choices

10/15/2014
05:33 | Author: Steven Lewis

Nhs epilepsy medicines
Epilepsy - NHS Choices

While medication cannot cure epilepsy, it is often used to control seizures. These medicines are known as anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). In around 70% of cases.

Page last reviewed: 06/09/2012.

The 8 comments about ‘Epilepsy’ posted are personal views. Any information they give has not been checked and may not be accurate.

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Just diagnosed info helpful and so is Epilepsy Action.

Next review due: 21/10/2015.

Socially disabling conditions can sometimes cause a deterioration in mental health of the patients (us), which in turn adds an extra un-neccessary strain on health services.

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Epilepsy - Map of Medicine - NHS Choices

12/14/2014
03:06 | Author: Allison King

Nhs epilepsy medicines
Epilepsy - Map of Medicine - NHS Choices

The Map of Medicine is used by doctors throughout the NHS to determine the best treatment options for their patients. NHS Choices offers everyone in England.

To take advantage of this unique resource go to:. The information in the Map has been approved by the UK's leading clinical experts, is based on the best available clinical evidence, and is continually updated.

Map of Medicine: epilepsy in adults.

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The Map of Medicine is used by doctors throughout the NHS to determine the best treatment options for their patients. NHS Choices offers everyone in England exclusive and free access to this cutting-edge internet resource, which lets you see exactly what your doctor sees.

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Epilepsy - Map of Medicine - NHS Choices.

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Epilepsy - Living with - NHS Choices

10/13/2014
01:41 | Author: Steven Lewis

Nhs epilepsy medicines
Epilepsy - Living with - NHS Choices

Anti-epilepsy medication controls seizures in around 70% of people. Working with your specialist to find the medication that suits you best, and taking it exactly.

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If you take anti-epileptic drugs, you are entitled to get all your prescriptions (not just those for AEDs) free of charge. Ask your doctor how to get an exemption certificate.

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You have the right to appeal against their decision at a magistrates' court.

Although the risk of SUDEP for someone with epilepsy is low, SUDEPs are estimated to cause between 500 and 1000 deaths in the UK every year.

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This will outline the help your child needs, set a number of long-term goals, and ensure your child is regularly reviewed.

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Lamotrigine - Epilepsy medicines and drugs - NHS Choices

8/12/2014
01:08 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Nhs epilepsy medicines
Lamotrigine - Epilepsy medicines and drugs - NHS Choices

Lamotrigine (Lam-ot-rij-een) is a medicine which is used in partial epilepsy, bipolar disorder, generalised epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and absence.

Lamotrigine (Lam-ot-rij-een) is a medicine which is used in partial epilepsy, bipolar disorder, generalised epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and absence seizures.

If you experience any unusual effects while taking this medicine in combination with complementary preparations and vitamins, you should l your prescriber.

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Furthermore the prescriber may only prescribe this medicine with special care or may not prescribe it at all for a child who is under two years of age.

When taking any medicine you should be aware that it might interfere with your ability to drive or operate machinery safely.

The effect on the baby differs between medicines and also depends on the stage of pregnancy that you have reached when you take the medicine.

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Epilepsy overview - NICE Pathways

6/11/2014
03:05 | Author: Molly Young

Nhs epilepsy medicines
Epilepsy overview - NICE Pathways

The epilepsies: diagnosis and management of the epilepsies in adults and children in primary and secondary care.

These are the paths in the Epilepsy pathway:

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Pathway created: January 2012 Last updated: August 2014 NICE 2014.

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