Nuclear medicine information








Nuclear Medicine, General - RadiologyInfo

7/11/2014
01:34 | Author: Allison King

Nuclear medicine information
Nuclear Medicine, General - RadiologyInfo

Current and accurate information for patients about nuclear medicine. Learn what you might experience, how to prepare for the exam, benefits, risks and much.

With some procedures, a catheter may be placed into your bladder, which may cause temporary discomfort.

Special camera or imaging devices used in nuclear medicine include the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT).

A PET scanner is a large machine with a round, doughnut shaped hole in the middle, similar to a CT or MRI unit. Within this machine are multiple rings of detectors that record the emission of energy from the radiotracer in your body.

You will receive specific instructions based on the type of scan you are undergoing.

Therapy Nuclear medicine also offers therapeutic procedures, such as radioactive iodine (I-131) therapy that use small amounts of radioactive material to treat cancer and other medical conditions affecting the thyroid gland, as well as treatments for other cancers and medical conditions.

Less intense areas, or "cold spots," indicate a smaller concentration of radiotracer and less chemical activity.

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About Nuclear Medicine Molecular Imaging - SNMMI

5/10/2014
01:28 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Nuclear medicine information
About Nuclear Medicine Molecular Imaging - SNMMI

Molecular imaging is a type of medical imaging that provides detailed pictures provide information that is unattainable with other imaging technologies or that.

SNMMI offers fact sheets that explain how nuclear medicine and molecular imaging can help diagnose and/or treat a wide range of diseases. Molecular imaging procedures—which are noninvasive, safe and painless—are used to diagnose and manage the treatment of cancer, heart disease, brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, gastrointestinal disorders, lung disorders, bone disorders, kidney and thyroid disorders, and more. View SNMMI Fact Sheets.

Molecular imaging is a type of medical imaging that provides detailed pictures of what is happening inside the body at the molecular and cellular level. Molecular imaging offers unique insights into the human body that enable physicians to personalize patient care. Nuclear medicine can also be used to treat certain types of cancer and other diseases. In terms of diagnosis, molecular imaging is able to:. Where other diagnostic imaging procedures—such as x-rays, computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound —offer pictures of physical structure, molecular imaging allows physicians to see how the body is functioning and to measure its chemical and biological processes. Molecular imaging includes the field of nuclear medicine, which uses very small amounts of radioactive materials ( radiopharmaceuticals ) to diagnose and treat disease. In nuclear medicine imaging, the radiopharmaceuticals are detected by special types of cameras that work with computers to provide very precise pictures of the area of the body being imaged.

As a tool for evaluating and managing the care of patients, molecular imaging studies help physicians:

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What is Nuclear Medicine? - Patient Care - Nuclear Medicine

3/9/2014
03:42 | Author: Chloe Allen

Nuclear medicine information
What is Nuclear Medicine? - Patient Care - Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear medicine involves the use of small amounts of radioactive materials (or tracers) PET can also give physicians important early information about heart.

Cardiac exams involve fasting for at least 4 hours before the exam and stress/persantine tests require no caffeine for 24 hours prior to the scan.

Although nuclear medicine is commonly used for diagnostic purposes, it also has valuable therapeutic applications such as treatment of hyperthyroidism, thyroid cancer, blood imbalances, and any bony pain from certain types of cancer.

For example, a PET scan is the most accurate, non-invasive way to l whether or not a tumor is benign or malignant, sparing patients expensive, often painful diagnostic surgeries and suggesting treatment options earlier in the course of the disease.

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What is Nuclear Medicine? - News Medical

11/18/2014
05:24 | Author: Chloe Allen

Nuclear medicine information
What is Nuclear Medicine? - News Medical

Nuclear medicine is a branch or specialty of medicine and medical imaging Net provides this medical information service in accordance with.

In nuclear medicine procedures, radionuclides are combined with other chemical compounds or pharmaceuticals to form radiopharmaceuticals.

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These radiopharmaceuticals, once administered to the patient, can localize to specific organs or cellular receptors.

This property of radiopharmaceuticals allows nuclear medicine the ability to image the extent of a disease-process in the body, based on the cellular function and physiology, rather than relying on physical changes in the tissue anatomy.

Please note that medical information found on this website is designed to support, not to replace the relationship between patient and physician/doctor and the medical advice they may provide. provides this medical information service in accordance with these terms and conditions.

Last Updated: Sep 15, 2014.

Treatment of disease, based on metabolism or uptake or binding of a ligand, may also be accomplished, similar to other areas of pharmacology.

Nuclear medicine is a branch or specialty of medicine and medical imaging that uses radioactive isotopes (radionuclides) and relies on the process of radioactive decay in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.

In some diseases nuclear medicine studies can identify medical problems at an earlier stage than other diagnostic tests.

However, radiopharmaceuticals rely on the tissue-destructive power of short-range ionizing radiation.

Wikipedia itself is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article on " Nuclear medicine " All material adapted used from Wikipedia is available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

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Nuclear medicine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

9/17/2014
03:30 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Nuclear medicine information
Nuclear medicine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty involving the application of radioactive . The fusion imaging technique in nuclear medicine provides information about.

The F-18 is then typically used to make FDG (see this link for more information on this process). The cyclotron is used to accelerate protons to bombard the stable heavy isotope of oxygen O-18. The O-18 constitutes about 0.20% of ordinary oxygen (mostly O-16 ), from which it is extracted. The most commonly used radioisotope in PET F-18, is not produced in any nuclear reactor, but rather in a circular accelerator called a cyclotron.

Abnormal whole body PET/CT scan with multiple metastases from a cancer.

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