Over the counter drugs information








OTC (Over the Counter) Drug Database

10/18/2014
01:07 | Author: Steven Lewis

Over the counter drugs information
OTC (Over the Counter) Drug Database

Detailed information about over the counter medications. Usage, warnings, dosage and directions.

provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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Examples: Tylenol, ibuprofen, etc.

These drugs are often located on shelves in pharmacies with easy access by patients, but may also be located in non-pharmacy outlets, such as grocery stores, convenience marts and large discount retailers.

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Over-the-Counter Medicines - National Library of Medicine

8/17/2014
01:26 | Author: Allison King

Over the counter drugs information
Over-the-Counter Medicines - National Library of Medicine

Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are drugs you can buy without a prescription. Be MedWise Quiz(National Council on Patient Information and Education).

Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated on 8 October 2014 Topic last reviewed 13 March 2014. Disclaimers Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S.

References and abstracts from MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine).

If your symptoms don't go away, it's a clear signal that it's time to see your healthcare provider. More medicine does not necessarily mean better. You should never take OTC medicines longer or in higher doses than the label recommends. It is important to take medicines correctly, and be careful when giving them to children.

If you're pregnant, talk to your health care provider before taking any medicines. Some interact with other medicines, supplements, foods or drinks. Others cause problems for people with certain medical conditions. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration decides whether a medicine is safe enough to sell over-the-counter. Taking OTC medicines still has risks.

Food and Drug Administration.

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Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are drugs you can buy without a prescription. Others help manage recurring problems, like migraines. Some OTC medicines relieve aches, pains and itches. Some prevent or cure diseases, like tooth decay and athlete's foot.

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Over-the-counter Products

6/16/2014
03:39 | Author: Steven Lewis

Over the counter drugs information
Over-the-counter Products

-- health information for the whole family There is an over-the-counter medicine for almost anything that ails you – from pain relievers to cough.

Dos and Don’ts of Giving OTC Cough and Cold Medicines to Your Child Cough Medicines.

How to Read an OTC Drug Facts Label.

Antiemetic Medicines for Nausea and Vomiting Antihistamines Decongestants Laxatives Pain Relievers Melatonin Echinacea.

OTC Cough and Cold Medicines and My Child.

Drug-Nutrient Interactions and Drug-Supplement Interactions.

Financial support provided by:

Herbal Products and Supplements.

Getting the Most from Your OTC Medicine.

OTC Medicines: Know Your Risks and Reduce Them.

Antacids and Acid Reducers Antidiarrheal Medicines.

This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

There is an over-the-counter medicine for almost anything that ails you – from pain relievers to cough and cold treatments to vitamins and minerals. Learn how to take your over-the-counter medicines safely, how to avoid side effects or potential interactions, and how to get the most from your medicine.

How to Give Your Child Medicine.

OTC Medicines and Pregnancy.

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Over-the-counter drug - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

4/15/2014
05:32 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Over the counter drugs information
Over-the-counter drug - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs are medicines sold directly to a consumer without a. Drug Facts labels include information on the product's active ingredient(s).

If they ask for a specific product, the pharmacy assistant must ask "Who is it for," "How long have you had the symptoms," "Are you allergic to any medication," "Are you taking any medication" ('WHAM' questions). If a customer asks for a remedy, e.g., hay fever, then the two WHAM questions must be followed "Who is it for," "What are the symptoms," "How long have you had the symptoms," "Have you taken any action towards your symptoms," and "Are you taking any other medication." It is with this information that the pharmacist can halt the sale, if need be.

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Understanding Over-the-Counter Medicines - Food and Drug

2/14/2014
07:05 | Author: Molly Young

Over the counter drugs information
Understanding Over-the-Counter Medicines - Food and Drug

What are over-the-counter (OTC) drugs and how are they approved? The information in this section will help you, working with your health.

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Protecting and Promoting Your Health.

The information in this section will help you, working with your health care professionals, to choose and use over-the-counter medicine wisely.

All these terms refer to medicine that you can buy without a prescription. They are safe and effective when you follow the directions on the label and as directed by your health care professional. Over-the-counter medicine is also known as OTC or nonprescription medicine.

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