Phenobarbital for dogs








The Side Effets of Phenobarbital for Dogs

02/02/2015
07:35 | Author: Molly Young

Phenobarbital for dogs
The Side Effets of Phenobarbital for Dogs

In epileptic dogs, Phenobarbital is the most commonly prescribed medication. Epilepsy is most common in certain breeds of dog, like German Shepherds, Irish.

You'll notice your dog appearing lazy, sedated, restless, hyper-excited or uncoordinated (ataxia). These side effects will disappear after a few weeks of treatment when your dog's system gets used to the medication. As a result, many of the side effects of Phenobarbital are neurological.

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Monitor his salt intake after beginning treatment. Potassium bromide allows vets to prescribe a lower dosage of Phenobarbital in order to lower the likelihood of developing liver damage, but can affect the salt levels of your dog's diet.

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Pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in dogs given multiple doses

02/02/2015
05:10 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Phenobarbital for dogs
Pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in dogs given multiple doses

Studies were conducted to examine the temporal changes in phenobarbital pharmacokinetics during chronic dosing in dogs. Ten dogs were allotted into 2.

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After single administration of 5.5 mg/kg of body weight or 15 mg/kg, the total body clearance (Clt/F) was 5.58 +/- 1.89 ml/h/kg and 7.28 +/- 1.07 ml/h/kg, respectively. The Clt/F and t1/2 were 10.2 +/- 1.7 ml/h/kg and 47.3 +/- 10.7 hours for the group given the low dose and 15.6 +/- 2.5 ml/h/kg and 31.1 +/- 4.4 hours for the group given the high dose, respectively. On day 90, the t1/2 was significantly (P less than 0.05) shorter and the Clt/F was significantly greater than single-dose values. The Clt/F was significantly (P less than 0.05) greater on days 30, 60, and 90 than the single dose for both groups. Ten dogs were allotted into 2 groups, administered a single oral dose, rested for 35 days, and then given the drug for 90 consecutive days. The half-lives (t1/2) for the 2 groups were 88.7 +/- 19.6 hours for the 5.5-mg/kg dose and 99.6 +/- 22.6 hours for the 15-mg/kg dose. After the last dose on day 90, several blood samples were obtained to determine phenobarbital t1/2. Both Clt/F and t1/2 were significantly (P less than 0.05) different between the 2 groups on day 90.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS). Multiple-dosing regimens (5.5 mg/kg/day or 11 mg/kg/day) were initiated in the same dogs for 90 days. Significant differences in Clt/F or t1/2 were not observed between the 2 groups. Studies were conducted to examine the temporal changes in phenobarbital pharmacokinetics during chronic dosing in dogs.

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National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA.

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Effects of long-term phenobarbital treatment on the liver in dogs

02/02/2015
03:35 | Author: Molly Young

Phenobarbital for dogs
Effects of long-term phenobarbital treatment on the liver in dogs

Long-term administration of phenobarbital has been reported to cause hepatic injury in dogs. Phenobarbital induces hepatic enzymes, and it may be difficult to.

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National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA.

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These results suggest that increases in serum ALP, ALT, and GGT may reflect enzyme induction rather than hepatic injury during phenobarbital treatment in dogs. Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), fasted bile acids (fBA), total bilirubin, and albumin were determined before and during treatment.

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Pharmacokinetics of zonisamide and drug interaction with

02/02/2015
01:00 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Phenobarbital for dogs
Pharmacokinetics of zonisamide and drug interaction with

Pharmacokinetics of zonisamide and drug interaction with phenobarbital in dogs. Orito K(1), Saito M, Fukunaga K, Matsuo E, Takikawa S, Muto M, Mishima K.

The purposes of the present study were to elucidate the pharmacokinetics of zonisamide, determine the presence of a drug interaction with phenobarbital, and evaluate how long any interaction lasted after discontinuation of phenobarbital in dogs. The maximum serum concentration and area under the serum concentration vs. Five dogs received zonisamide (5 mg/kg, p.o. Blood was sampled until 24 h after each zonisamide administration and serum concentrations of zonisamide were determined. and i.v.) before and during repeated oral administration of phenobarbital (5 mg/kg, bid, for 30-35 days). Repeated phenobarbital decreased the maximum serum concentration, area under the serum concentration vs. time curve of zonisamide continued to be low until 10 weeks after the discontinuation of phenobarbital. Total clearance increased. time curve, apparent elimination half-life, and bioavailability of zonisamide. They were restored to the same serum concentration as before phenobarbital administration 12 weeks after the discontinuation of phenobarbital. Zonisamide (5 mg/kg, p.o.) was also administered 8, 10, and 12 weeks after discontinuation of phenobarbital. These data suggested that repeated administration of a clinical dose of phenobarbital enhanced the clearance of zonisamide and the enhanced clearance lasted at least 10 weeks after the discontinuation of phenobarbital. Time to maximum serum concentration and volume distribution were not changed. Caution may be necessary when zonisamide is given with phenobarbital and when antiepileptic therapy is changed from phenobarbital to zonisamide.

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National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA.

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Alternative anticonvulsant drugs for dogs with seizure disorders

02/02/2015
01:15 | Author: Molly Young

Phenobarbital for dogs
Alternative anticonvulsant drugs for dogs with seizure disorders

People with seizure disorders have many drug options, but are there safe and effective alternatives to phenobarbital and bromide in dogs?.

Such use of these alternative drugs is more commonly pursued with smaller dog breeds. The drugs discussed in this article cost considerably more than phenobarbital or bromide. Because of their increased expense, these drugs are typically used as add-on therapy to standard anticonvulsant drug regimens. Clorazepate. This article provides small-animal clinicians with a reference source for alternatives to phenobarbital and bromide. In some cases, these drugs have been used as replacement therapy or as sole anticonvulsant agents.

A dosage of 2 mg/kg given every 12 hours has also been suggested.2-5 The therapeutic range in dogs receiving clorazepate is 100 to 400 ng/ml of nordiazepam.2 Because of the short and somewhat variable elimination half-life of the drug, it is important to obtain both peak and trough serum concentrations when monitoring patients.

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