Potassium epilepsy








Potassium Channels (including KCNQ) and Epilepsy - Jasper39s

02/02/2015
05:33 | Author: Steven Lewis

Potassium epilepsy
Potassium Channels (including KCNQ) and Epilepsy - Jasper39s

Potassium ion (K+) channels are implicated in epilepsy by their physiology, genetics, and pharmacology. K+ channels are ubiquitous in neuronal and glial cell.

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Edward C Cooper, MD, PhD.

KCNQ5 is widely expressed, but its neuronal function is just beginning to be explored. 38 In vitro, KCNQ2-5 subunits can form functional homotetrameric channels. Two additional closely related KCNQ channel subunits have also been identified (KCNQ4 and KCNQ5). 37 KCNQ4 expression is apparently somewhat restricted, including auditory hair cells and neurons in the central auditory pathways (mutations in KCNQ4 give rise to a dominant progressive hearing loss syndrome).

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The Neurobiology of Epilepsy

02/02/2015
03:06 | Author: Allison King

Potassium epilepsy
The Neurobiology of Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a complex disease with diverse clinical characteristics that preclude . Indeed, blockade of the sodium-potassium ATPase can lead to seizure activity.

Conversely, disrupting the mechanisms that bring neurons close to their firing threshold, or enhancing the ways neurons are inhibited, usually prevents seizure activity. Seizures can be caused by multiple mechanisms, and often they appear so diverse that one would suspect that no common theme applies. Thus, normally there are controls that keep neurons from excessive action potential discharge, but there are also mechanisms that facilitate neuronal firing so the nervous system can function appropriay.

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Can Low Potassium Cause Seizures?

02/02/2015
01:41 | Author: Steven Lewis

Potassium epilepsy
Can Low Potassium Cause Seizures?

Potassium is a mineral your body uses for purposes that include maintenance of your normal heart function and the contraction of both your.

Hypokalemia technically sets in when your blood levels of potassium fall below 3.5 mEq/L. However, you probably won't develop any symptoms of the disorder if your potassium levels range between 3.0 and 3.5 mEq/L. If your potassium levels remains low for extended periods, normal kidney function may be impaired. If your levels fall below 3.0 mEq/L, you can develop symptoms that include muscle weakness, muscle cramps, muscle twitching, low blood pressure, respiratory failure, paralysis and the muscle breakdown disorder called rhabdomyolysis.

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However, if you have severe hypokalemia, you may need intravenous potassium.

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Can low Potassium, Phosphorus result in a seizure? Epilepsy

02/02/2015
01:08 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Potassium epilepsy
Can low Potassium, Phosphorus result in a seizure? Epilepsy

So, question #1 is, can low potassium and phosphorous trigger a seizure? I'm suspicious I had a full tonic-clonic seizure, but unfortunay no.

I was in the ER for 17 hours having seizures before they did my blood work and admitted me. That happened to me, so I think it can. By morning, I was having one every other minute. After the second surgery, the seizures were under control with medication and I only had a couple seizures due to sleep deprivation and stress during college. The second they gave me potassium, the seizures quit. I wasn't sure if it was low potassium or stress that caused my seizures, but I would guess it was the low potassium.

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EPILEPSY AND SEIZURES - Dr. Wilson

02/02/2015
03:05 | Author: Molly Young

Potassium epilepsy
EPILEPSY AND SEIZURES - Dr. Wilson

I receive an about someone who has developed seizures at least once a week. Often they occur in.. THE SODIUM/POTASSIUM RATIO AND EPILEPSY.

Other possible reasons for childhood seizures with infections may be a change in the blood pH, or a fast oxidation rate that results in low calcium, magnesium and zinc. Other mechanisms for seizures due to infections are also possible, such as the effect of toxins secreted by bacteria or other infective agents.

The process may occur quickly, or it can take a year or a number of years if a person is malnourished and out of balance. However, this is not a 100% reliable indicator, as it is common in people without seizures, as well.

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