Status seizures epilepsy








Status Epilepticus - Medscape Reference

11/11/2014
02:21 | Author: Nicholas Clark

Status seizures epilepsy
Status Epilepticus - Medscape Reference

Status epilepticus (SE) is a common, life-threatening neurologic disorder that is essentially an acute, prolonged epileptic crisis. SE can.

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Non-convulsive status epilepticus - Doose Syndrome Epilepsy

11/10/2014
12:18 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

Status seizures epilepsy
Non-convulsive status epilepticus - Doose Syndrome Epilepsy

Fortunay, convulsive status epilepticus is not a reported seizure type associated with MAE. There is, however, a peculiar and rare type of non-convulsive.

This non-convulsive status (NCSE) is not life threatening or brain damaging but should be recognized and treated. If this situation continues for a long period it can be serious because it usually means that the child is immobile and non-verbal but, more importantly, unable to swallow. Non-convulsive status in MAE can also be subtle and very difficult to detect without an EEG. This milder condition is termed by MAE parents as "high-functioning NCSE". There is no evidence that spike-wave stupor seen with NCSE causes permanent damage to the brain, even when it goes on for hours or days.

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Status Epilepticus - AboutKidsHealth

9/9/2014
02:23 | Author: Steven Lewis

Status seizures epilepsy
Status Epilepticus - AboutKidsHealth

Status epilepticus happens when a seizure continues for a long time (more than half an hour), or when a child has several seizures without time to recover.

If the child is having convulsive status epilepticus, ease her onto the floor or a bed to prevent injury. First aid for status epilepticus is similar to that for “normal” seizures.

In some cases it is only possible to diagnose non-convulsive status epilepticus with an EEG. There are several different forms of status epilepticus in which the child does not go into convulsions, but may just seem confused or sleepy.

One study found that over a period of five years from the first diagnosis of epilepsy, 20% of people had at least one episode of convulsive status epilepticus.

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Know the Differences between Seizures, Epilepsy Mimics - Patient

7/8/2014
04:56 | Author: Chloe Allen

Status seizures epilepsy
Know the Differences between Seizures, Epilepsy Mimics - Patient

Distinguish the differences between seizures and status epilepticus. Absence seizures: The seizure seen in absence epilepsy, consisting of a.

Rectal suppositories are available for home use. As the current EMS drug shortages continue, EMS agencies should be familiar with all three of these medications in the event that one or more of them isn’t available. Pharmacological Intervention Effective termination of a seizure requires early administration of benzodiazepines.(7,9) Diazepam, lorazepam and midazolam have individual pros and cons, but they all play a role in achieving seizure cessation. Although they’re most often used in small children, some adults may have been treated in this manner prior to EMS arrival.

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Status Epilepticus Johns Hopkins Medicine Health Library

5/7/2014
06:55 | Author: Molly Young

Status seizures epilepsy
Status Epilepticus Johns Hopkins Medicine Health Library

A seizure that lasts at least 30 minutes is called status epilepticus, or a prolonged seizure. This is a medical emergency that may lead to brain damage or death.

Loss of bowel or bladder control Clenched teeth Irregular breathing Unusual behavior Difficulty speaking A "daydreaming" look.

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This is a medical emergency that may lead to permanent brain damage or death. Many medical experts become concerned that a seizure is status epilepticus after it lasts five to 10 minutes. A seizure that lasts at least 30 minutes is called status epilepticus, or a prolonged seizure.

This is an emergency that requires immediate medical care.

Learn about brain mapping research at Johns.

Most people who experience status epilepticus don't have epilepsy; only about 25 percent do.

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