What is epilepsy








What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy Foundation

8/10/2014
01:27 | Author: Steven Lewis

What is epilepsy
What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy Foundation

Page Summary. Epilepsy is the fourth most common neurological disorder and affects people of all ages; Epilepsy means the same thing as "seizure disorders".

How epilepsy is perceived or how people are treated (stigma) often is a bigger problem than the seizures. Having seizures and epilepsy also can also affect one's safety, relationships, work, driving and so much more.

The location of that event, how it spreads and how much of the brain is affected, and how long it lasts all have profound effects. Although the symptoms of a seizure may affect any part of the body, the electrical events that produce the symptoms occur in the brain. The human brain is the source of human epilepsy. These factors determine the character of a seizure and its impact on the individual.

The word "epilepsy" does not indicate anything about the cause of the person's seizures or their severity. A person is diagnosed with epilepsy if they have had at least two seizures that were not caused by some known and reversible medical condition like alcohol withdrawal or extremely low blood sugar. The seizures in epilepsy may be related to a brain injury or a family tendency, but often the cause is compley unknown.

Learn more about the ILAE at www.ilae.org.

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Many people with epilepsy have more than one type of seizure and may have other symptoms of neurological problems as well. Epilepsy is a chronic disorder, the hallmark of which is recurrent, unprovoked seizures.

". Dr. After a consensus process involving international medical professionals and public comment, the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) published a new definition for epilepsy. Robert Fisher, leader of the ILAE task force and former editor-in-chief of, discusses the new definition in the editorial, " A Revised Definition of Epilepsy.

In these situations, their condition can be defined as a specific epilepsy syndrome. Sometimes EEG testing, clinical history, family history and outlook are similar among a group of people with epilepsy.

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What is Epilepsy? - Comprehensive Epilepsy Center

6/9/2014
03:14 | Author: Allison King

What is epilepsy
What is Epilepsy? - Comprehensive Epilepsy Center

Epilepsy is a disorder in which a person has two or more unprovoked seizures. Unprovoked means that the seizures are not brought on by a clear cause such as.

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There are many types of epilepsy, depending on age of onset, seizure type(s), EEG findings, family history, and neurological history, among other factors. A person with epilepsy has had two or more unprovoked seizures, regardless of seizure type.

In other words, epilepsy is a condition of recurrent, unprovoked seizures. Epilepsy is a disorder in which a person has two or more unprovoked seizures. The seizures may result from a hereditary tendency or a brain injury, but often the cause is unknown. Unprovoked means that the seizures are not brought on by a clear cause such as alcohol withdrawal, heart problems, or extremely low blood sugar. However, almost all seizure disorders are epilepsy. Many use the term “seizure disorder” instead because “epilepsy” seems more serious or stigmatized.

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Epilepsy Causes - Diseases and Conditions - Mayo Clinic

4/8/2014
05:21 | Author: Steven Lewis

What is epilepsy
Epilepsy Causes - Diseases and Conditions - Mayo Clinic

Epilepsy has no identifiable cause in about half of those with the condition. In about half the people with epilepsy, the condition may be traced to various factors.

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Epilepsy has no identifiable cause in about half of those with the condition. In about half the people with epilepsy, the condition may be traced to various factors.

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Some types of epilepsy, which are categorized by the type of seizure you experience, run in families. Genetic influence. In these cases, it's likely that there's a genetic influence.

Researchers have linked some types of epilepsy to specific genes, though it's estimated that up to 500 genes could be tied to the condition. Certain genes may make a person more sensitive to environmental conditions that trigger seizures. For most people, genes are only part of the cause of epilepsy.

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Epilepsy - KidsHealth

2/7/2014
07:48 | Author: Jeremy Rodriguez

What is epilepsy
Epilepsy - KidsHealth

Seizures are a common symptom of epilepsy, a condition that affects millions of people worldwide. Learn all about epilepsy, including what to do if you see.

More than 180,000 people are diagnosed with epilepsy every year. Epilepsy is a condition of the nervous system that affects 2.5 million Americans.

And exercise to reduce stress and stay in shape. Eat right. Get plenty of sleep. If you have epilepsy, follow your treatment plan. Epilepsy sounds frightening, but managing it can be simple.

Partial seizures start in one part of the brain. The electrical disturbances may then move to other parts of the brain or they may stay in one area until the seizure is over.

There's usually no need to call 911 if the person having a seizure is known to have epilepsy.

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NINDS Epilepsy Information Page - National Institutes of Health

10/16/2014
01:05 | Author: Molly Young

What is epilepsy
NINDS Epilepsy Information Page - National Institutes of Health

Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders information page compiled by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).

Advice on the treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a physician who has examined that patient or is familiar with that patient's medical history. NINDS health-related material is provided for information purposes only and does not necessarily represent endorsement by or an official position of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke or any other Federal agency.

Once epilepsy is diagnosed, it is important to begin treatment as soon as possible.

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