What is epilepsy nhs








What to do if someone has a seizure - Live Well - NHS Choices

03/08/2015
10:29 | Author: Steven Lewis

What is epilepsy nhs
What to do if someone has a seizure - Live Well - NHS Choices

If you see someone having a seizure or fit, there are some simple things you can do to help. Use this article to find out what they are, and when to call an.

As the person is coming round, they may be confused, so try to comfort them.

“Try to comfort them and make sure they’re not hurting themselves,” says Dr Chris Clough, consultant neurologist (brain specialist) at King’s College Hospital, London. It might be scary to see someone having a seizure, but don’t panic.

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NHS Direct Wales - Encyclopaedia Epilepsy

03/08/2015
08:02 | Author: Chloe Allen

What is epilepsy nhs
NHS Direct Wales - Encyclopaedia Epilepsy

NHS Direct Wales is a health advice and information service available 24 Epilepsy is a condition that affects the brain and causes repeated.

If they do not have a high risk of having further seizures, they would not be regarded as having epilepsy. Some people may only have a single seizure at some point during their life.

Read more about diagnosing epilepsy.

They cause the person to lose awareness of their surroundings, usually for up to 15 seconds. Absence seizures, sometimes called petit mal, mainly affect children, but they also occur in adults. The child will have no memory of the seizure. The person will seem to stare vacantly into space, although some people will flutter their eyes or smack their lips.

This is because many people have a one-off epileptic seizure during their lifetime.

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What is epilepsy? - University Hospital Southampton NHS

03/08/2015
06:53 | Author: Molly Young

What is epilepsy nhs
What is epilepsy? - University Hospital Southampton NHS

A seizure is a brief disruption of the brain's normal electrical activity leading to a variety of symptoms. The symptoms experienced by the person with epilepsy.

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Find out more about the tests and investigations we do to find out if you have epilepsy. Epilepsy can often be confirmed from the description of the seizure, best provided by a witness, and the patient's medical history and examination of their nervous system.

There are many misconceptions about epilepsy and although some people do have some difficulties because of their seizures, most people with epilepsy live normal lives. The Wessex neurological centre supports patients in achieving this.

Someone who has epilepsy often has recurrent seizures (fits).

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There is no single test to diagnose epilepsy.

Although there are different types of seizures, people with epilepsy normally only experience one or two different kinds. The person's seizures are often exactly the same each time they occur.

A seizure is a brief disruption of the brain's normal electrical activity leading to a variety of symptoms. The symptoms experienced by the person with epilepsy during a seizure depend on where in the brain the abnormal electrical activity occurs.

Seizures may induce unusual sensations, movements or behaviours without full loss of consciousness or the person may black out, fall, and jerk violently.

Epilepsy is the most common serious medical condition affecting the brain. It can also affect anyone at any time.

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Some of these symptoms can be caused by other medical conditions, including fainting or as a result of anxiety.

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Epilepsy (leaflets)

03/08/2015
04:24 | Author: Allison King

What is epilepsy nhs
Epilepsy (leaflets)

Easy read information leaflet for service users. Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUPDEP). A leaflet by Leicestershire Partneship NHS Trust. Cost: Free.

A leaflet by Leicestershire Partneship NHS Trust Cost: Free.

A leaflet by Easyhealth. Cost: Free.

Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUPDEP).

A leaflet by Books Beyond Words Cost: Free.

Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUPDEP).

Cost: Free. A leaflet by the Foundation for People with Learning Difficulties, Prodigy and Easyhealth.

A leaflet by the South Staffordshire and Shropshire Healthcare NHS foundation trust. Cost: Free.

Cost: Free. Cost: Free. A leaflet by the South Staffordshire and Shropshire Healthcare NHS foundation trust.

A leaflet by Leicestershire Partneship NHS Trust Cost: Free.

Cost: Free. A leaflet by the Elfrida Society.

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Non epileptic seizures - Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust

03/08/2015
02:15 | Author: Molly Young

What is epilepsy nhs
Non epileptic seizures - Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust

A non epileptic seizure is another type of seizure. It can look similar to epileptic seizures or faints, but it is not caused by abnormal electrical discharges or blood.

At the other end of the spectrum are people with health problems. In all cases, psychologists work with their clients to find out what things are working for them, what things are holding them back and, therefore, what things they could change to make a difference to their lives. Back to top. At one end of the spectrum this might be sportspeople who want to win a particular event, or businesspeople who want to be good leaders. No. Psychologists see normal, rational people who have a problem they want to solve.

Put simply, there is no type of person for whom therapy is not potentially suitable.

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